How To Play Faster: A Method That Actually Works – Guitar Lesson

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Taken from a lesson with my 18 year old student Pedro Asfora from Brazil. https://www.youtube.com/user/MultiDaGuy

18 comments

  1. Can you explain what the correct technique is?

  2. So to make a long story short, how do I play faster?

  3. Fantastic lesson – Martin definitely seems to have looked into this a fair bit with biological concepts. I feel like it also seems to give more of a 'quick reward' than the typical practice something, increase the bpm, practice a bit more ,increase bpm etc because you're realising you're potential speed and working back almost. Probably not describing my thoughts very well but interesting stuff!

  4. Tauno Kekkonen

    I've always done like this without knowing why it seems to work. I guess I noticed that your picking technique is dramatically different at different speeds, and you can not build speed by starting slow and building up while using "slow picking" techniques. What I've done is try and play it fast and get it right once, and then reflect on how it felt and try to replicate.

  5. hhhahahaah it actually works…I lost 17 years working progressively….i feel like i lost too much time frustrated…at the same time those years also gave me enough experience to improve with confidence

  6. Mexican Zeppelin

    He's absolutely correct. Step one get the technique right, then in short bursts start going beyond your limit. Most people won't try it because it may break down a little, but you absolutely have to go past your current limit. He's correct that you can't think about every note like you do when you are developing technique. The brain will process in chunks and if you are sweeping it will process a whole ascending or descending riff at once. It's weird at first because you don't feel like you are playing guitar. It's like unlearning old habits of processing every note separately.

  7. Great video – really helpful. As a classical woodwind player, we do something similar for ultra-fast tongued articulation.

    Also, Pedro Asfora, the student in this lesson is a fantastic young guitar player (check out this, for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3h4umcYTIio). It's fantastic to have a lesson online where he is not afraid to be seen in the context of an acolyte someone learning what they can from a master.

  8. Damn, pewdiepie can PLAY!

  9. Shaleen Sharma

    New found respect for you Martin.

  10. Bigdaddy Granpa

    This old dude found this to be helpful. Best quote ….Just worry about speed !!! Thanks man

  11. My God, this makes so much sense

  12. greetings from germany
    good lesson martin

  13. If you want to play something fast, practice it at speeds in excess of your desired tempo. find that muscle memory…. the accuracy will come with repetition… your brain will figure it out through feel and experimentation.

  14. Adam McClendon

    …truly, this is a seemingly paradoxical problem.

    If your are doing it right, then you can push it and do it fast.

    If you aren't doing it right, you aren't going to do it fast…. but within that is the key… do it right…then you can do it fast.

  15. kennethmanuntag

    Miller is correct..if you rust things you are only concentrating to the first and last notes.. well basicaly it also defends on how fast you learn even if you push yourself.. maybe some poeple can…

  16. mohamed ali jassem

    This is by far the best lesson for me on how to play fast and accurate, no bullshit on how you should play this this kind of specific pattern in a certain amount of times in order to build speed, this guy is straight forward on the approach, God bless you

  17. Not many can pick as smooth as Martin and he knows it.

  18. I used to disagree but now I'm convinced

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